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perspective Archives - Krister Eide Art

Sketching Scenes with Maquettes

By | art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Composition, Fantasy, Illustration, Perspective, RMCAD, SCBWI | No Comments

maquetteIn Concept Illustration, we have an assignment to design an illustration based on the broad theme of conflict (character vs character, character vs. environment etc). I’ve thought about doing illustrations from the original Snow Queen so on our thumbnail assignment, which was limited to black and white and approximately 1 x 2 inches.

I’ve always been inspired with James Gurney’s maquette work (here is his Skybax maquette made out of armature wire, sculpey, floral wire, and stockings covered with latex among other ingredients.

gurney-skybax-maquetteI liked being able to walk around the scene and vary the perspective – vertically and horizontally. I used armature wire and chavant clay which doesn’t harden.

I also had to have 2 color comps and three 3-color value sketches. My instructor picked thumbnail 3 so that’s the one I’m working on, but with more background added.

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snow-queen-thumbs

Our discussion this past week was to collect illustrations that could be used as inspiration for creating your scene. I picked these great works by Sendak, Lathrop, and Dulac.

sendak

 

 

lathrop

 

 

 

 

 

dulac

 

Atmospheric Perspective in Painting – Examples

By | Painting, Perspective, Technique | No Comments

In these exercises, we had to select works of art that reflected techniques of atmospheric perspective or ways of rendering depth or distance by tone, hue, or detail. Here are my comments on the paintings as well as my painting of Bracketts Landing near my home in Edmonds (last, exaggerated colors).

Caillebotte: Closer figures are darker than the ones in the background. Compare the dark dog and figures in the fore grand compared to the light building and person crossing the road in the back. More precise detail is given to foreground figures than those in the distance, mimicking human vision. There is strong one-point perspective composition. The side opening bridge create the illusion of depth. The railing also shows much more detail closer than farther.


Caillebotte

Michael Orwick: Michael Orwick is a painter from Oregon that my mom recently interviewed. In Misty Morning, atmospheric perspective convey strongly by both the relative sharpness of closer trees and the relative lightness of farther trees. This painting also is a good example of how hue can be used to convey sense of depth. The close trees are orange and brown and trees in the distance behind the fog are more lavender.

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Bierstadt: In Bierstadt’s painting, atmospheric perspective is conveyed by fine detail in the foreground figures, using shadows and sharp contrast (look at the use of white on the figures). It’s also possible to see details like the fringe on the mats that are being made. In the mid ground, the mountains ad less distinct with a narrower range of contrast between colors. Also Bierstadt show masterful use of contrast differences between the waves close to the viewer and far to convey atmospheric perspective.

Bierstadt Seurat: In Sunday Afternoon, atmospheric perspective is conveyed by detail and contrast. Examples of detail and  contrast to create the illusion of depth are notable for instance in the woman with an umbrella in the foreground (strong dark garment and light face) vs. mid ground (more subtle differences in contrast). Analysis of hue in this painting is more complex because figures are in sun or shade, but what Seurat does seem to do is have bands of hue at depths that connect characters at that level whether they are in sun or shade, creating a more uniform illusion of depth. Examples include row of people in the foreground in shadow vs. a little farther back in sun, and then still farther seated in shadow.SeuratBrackett’s Landing in Edmonds, WA.  Krister-Bracketts

Adventures in Perspective

By | Perspective | No Comments

My hardest course this quarter is Perspective. We started off with learning terminology, analyzing perspective in paintings and in photos, and now are drawing environments. Because I mostly draw animals and people, this course was a bit of a challenge. I’m enjoying it more now though. The nice thing about the rules of perspective, though, is that once you learn them, environments are a lot  easier and predictable.

One Point Perspective: Munch and Wizard of Oz
Two Point Perspective: Church
Three Point Perspective: Escher.
Finding Vanishing Points: Dali and Building Photo

Another nice bit of news. I heard today that 2 of my art pieces were chosen to be on display in the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design Rotunda.

one point perspective

1 point perspective

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