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iPad Archives - Krister Eide Art

My Free Visual Storytelling From Your Imagination Course on Skillshare

By | art school, digital, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, Illustration, Skillshare | No Comments

I have a new class! It’s called Visual Storytelling from Your Imagination

 

I’m teaching it on Skillshare HERE

If you click on the link above, you’ll be able to watch the class for FREE AND get 2 months free of Skillshare Premium where you can choose from thousands of other classes for creatives. They will ask for your credit card to get the 2 month free trial, but as long as you cancel before the time’s up, you won’t be charged for anything.

Procreate is the most affordable professional-level drawing and painting program for the iPad. When combined with the Apple Pencil , it’s a pretty effortless art-creating experience.

In my class, I go from first sketches to final illustration and talk about composition, design, and inspiration. Using the affordable, yet professional-level app Procreate, I’ll show you how to bring your digital drawing and painting to life. This class is suitable for all levels of artists, including complete beginners.

if you upload projects in the project area, I’ll comment and give you helpful feedback!

Here are a few more details about the class:

1. CHOOSE A FANTASY SCENE TO ILLUSTRATE.  Would you like to create a dragon rider like me or another fantasy scene?  If you don’t know where to start, check out my suggestions for inspiration and brainstorming in Lesson 1.

2. FIND REFERENCES. Hunting for references an important part of my creative process.  I’ll give you my favorite tips for findings ideas and organizing visual references. How do you find references for things that don’t exist? I’ll have plenty of answers for you in Lesson2.

3. FIRST SKETCHES AND THUMBNAILS. Commit yourself to drawing out different ideas. Don’t worry if things are ugly. It’s fine for things to look ugly at this stage. We’ll discuss thumbnails, composition, rule of thirds, and positive and negative space.

4. COLOR, LAYERS, SHADING, and DETAILS. This is a fun stage to work on. We’ll add color and I’ll share tips that you might want to consider when choosing colors that work together in harmony. This video will also talk about special brushes and Procreate’s blending modes that can help with painting more realistic people, animals, and clothing. I’ll be showing you some nifty tricks with clipping masks that will help you finalize your forms and you’ll see your realistic 3d drawings emerge out of your 2d sketch!

5. FINAL TOUCHES: LIGHTING, LAYERS, TEXTURES, and STORY  This final video will show you how to make decisions about lighting (screen, soft light, hard light, multiply, etc), varying colors and tools to try new ideas to really make the scene come alive.  We’ll also think about the final storytelling details for your piece. These details help people want to know more and really get into your world.

Here’s an intro I made for the course:

Sketching Bears, Wolves, and Dogs

By | Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Drawing, Illustration | No Comments

This week’s assignment are gestures of bears, wolves, and dogs. Using a envelope for the animals and simplifying geometric shapes helps with simplifying. The class is setting into a routine of drawing gestures with a little value added in some, skeleton and ecorche version, and discussion post which looks at different rendering of animals characters and how they can be portrayed as protagonists or antagonists in a story. It’s fun seeing the examples that my classmates come up with.

I’m finding I really like drawing with the Procreate app on the iPad pro and Apple pencil. It’s close to drawing with a real pencil. When I want this soft effect with pencil, I usually prefer to use mylar (Dura-lar) which comes in huge rolls from Dick Blick and erases cleanly.

bearslittle-polar-bearwolves

labrador-1labrador-2labrador-3

My discussion post:
There’s some amount of range when it comes to how sympathetically bear characters are portrayed. On the sympathetic side, there are characters such as teddy bears, and related characters such as the Care Bears and Winnie the Pooh, which are modeled more on the stuffed animal than the actual animal.

poohlitte-bear

More realistic sympathetic bears include Baloo from any of the multiple adaptations of The Jungle Book, Smokey the Bear, and the bear family of Maurice Sendak’s Little Bear.

On the more antipathetic side, there are characters such as the bear in the film version of The Fox and the Hound, and the grizzly bear from the film Balto, which are portrayed as bestial, inhuman predators.

When wolves are portrayed positively, they tend to come off as majestic, intelligent, loyal, embodying the nobility of nature; the wolf family in The Jungle Book, Moro in Princess Mononoke.

wolf-3

 

Negatively, wolves are portrayed as crafty predators, as with the classical fairytale archetype of the Big Bad Wolf.

 

 

wolf-4The main example I can think of when it comes to neutral/background characters is how, in Donald Duck etc. comics, otherwise “human” side/background characters tend to be given dog noses, and occasionally ears. Here, the use of animal characteristics basically just signifies that these stories take place in a completely unreal fantasy world.
In general, I would say that completely realistic renderings of animals, as you might find in an educational book, often have less strong emotional expressivity, and are less immediately emotionally accessible as a result. Even mostly realistic designs often “cheat” when it comes to faces, adding human elements such as humanoid scleras, eyebrow muscles, and mouth expressions.

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