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art Archives - Krister Eide Art

Spring – New Animals in Our Wildcare Center

By Illustration, Mixed Media, Painting, Photoshop No Comments

Here’s a newborn baby Douglas squirrel. Their nest was found broken on the ground with no other babies or mom in sight. We think it may have been a predator.

We also have 6 Western cottontails and a new screech owl. The last screech owl has recovered well and has been released.

 

 

I’m in Digital Illustration II now and we’re doing practicing realistic techniques. Not as fun as narrative illustrations, but I’m definitely picking up some new things. I had a great trip to New York City – I’ll post that later this week. The smaller picture is the photo reference.

 

 

 

Smiling Crow and Wildlife Rehabilitation

By Animals, birds, Cute Animals, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

Smiling-crow-crop

 

Here’s a great commission that I had a chance to draw, a smiling crow. I haven’t had a chance to post, but now I’m taking Non-Western Art History. It’s passing pretty quickly (Haiti, India, China, Japan so far), but it’s been interesting.

At the beginning of summer, I also had a chance to start working in a small wildlife rehabilitation center. It’s been a great experience so far – mostly birds and small mammals. Here are two long-time residents, Hooligan and Eclipse  – both barred owls who aren’t able to be released because they have one wing. They are beautiful. It’s Hooligan who likes to talk.

[wpvideo R08eVJEd]

Western Washington SCBWI Spring Conference – This Week!

By Animals, art school, artists groups, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, Illustration, SCBWI One Comment

I’m be  attending my first Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Conference this week in Redmond. I’m doing some tweaks to my portfolio (here’s my new improved Snow Queen) and printing up business cards and postcards.

I’m signed up for the Illustrator Intensive “Hard Things to Draw” with David Small (see some of his covers below) as well as participating in the Juried Portfolio show. I’m looking forward to seeing lots of portfolios and hearing from other illustrators and writers, art directors, and agents. I’ve heard these conferences are great for networking and getting started in children’s books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s my design for a business card: 

I’m also doing  film class this RMCAD quarter, so I’m putting together a short film discussion of the movie, Vertigo.

I had a great chance to interview author and film critic Jeffrey Overstreet and attorney and film lecturer Robert Cumbow, in addition to my family. I even attended a 6-hour Cinema Dissection of Vertigo at the Seattle International Film Festival Center which gave me an even deeper understanding of the film.

Bird Beaks and Eats

By Animals, birds, Children, Cute Animals, digital, Painting 2 Comments

Here’s some illustrations I was asked to make by my local Audubon society, Pilchuck Audubon. Jim Beneteau and other volunteers give lectures to school children about different beak adaptations and how they’re suited to what they eat. They didn’t have good visual illustrations, so I made these prints for them for their traveling kit.

Jim, Valerie, and Laurel asked for common birds that children might recognize in their backyards. The nice thing about having more picture of birds and what they eat is that students can think more about they are actually seeing. There’s the barn swallow that needs dart around quickly to grab insects, hummingbird that sips nectar deep in flowers, robin that digs around in dirt for worms, and pelican who eats fish.

If anyone is interested in purchasing cards for their classroom, they can contact me HERE.

My next painting is for Seattle Audubon. I’ll be painting a marbled murrelet which is an endangered species in Washington, Oregon, and California. It’s a sea bird that nests miles inland in old growth forests, so its vulnerable in both ocean and forest habitats. Its a neat bird that has webbed feet, but also is found in the tops of trees.

 

Deer Illustration Final and SCBWI Keep It Simple Art Show

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Drawing, Fantasy, Illustration, ink, kids lit art, SCBWI No Comments

Here’s my finished (I think) ink wash illustration from my concept class. Now I’ve begun Still Life, so it’s back to paintbrushes.

I did want to share some photos from our Western Washington SCBWI Keep It Simple Show. I’m lucky that it’s such a great group. Everyone was very generous and it was incredibly helpful seeing other people’s work, their tear sheets, and business cards. I’ve put in links to their websites on their works below. Check them out to be inspired. The artists are David Joaquin and Liz Wong in the top row; Maja Sereda and Tracy Wallschaleger of Red Dog Images.

The keynote speaker for the night was Jennifer Soloway of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. She gave a fantastic talk on how to stand out from the slush pile, great first lines, and some of the ins and outs of being an artists’ representative.

david-joaquin liz-wong
tracy-wallschlaegerscreen-shot-2016-10-27-at-4-35-10-pm

A Tale of Two Poes – Edgar Allan Poe and Raven Drawing

By art school, Children's book illustration, Portraits, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

This past week, I had a caricature assignment. Caricatures aren’t usually my favorite art form, but it was interesting because of the way the class is held. The first step is extensive visual research on the person, then word lists based on different aspects of the person. I picked Gothic poet Edgar Allan Poe, so his words and poems also helped with generating a word list.

Next, our discussion was to share 3 caricature artists who could serve as an inspiration for our assignment. I picked David Levine, Mort Drucker, and Miguel Covarrubias who did Stanley Kubrick, Albert Einstein, and FDR below.

kubrick-2 kubrick1

 

 

 

 

einstein-1 einstein-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fdr-1 fdr-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had to do a final line drawing, 2 value sketches, and 2 color options based on a value sketch that we liked best. I drew the original in pencil on Mylar (much cleaner to erase) then added value and color using Photoshop and an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil. Caricature is helpful because it teaches you to simplify and pick the key features that make up a person or his or her expression.

value-1-poe value-2-poe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

orange-poe-submit purple-poe-submit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which do you like best?  I think my teacher liked orange Poe the best, but I thought the purple Poe best fit with his melancholia. I also just opened up a store on Red Bubble. If you’d like to get a print or card, visit HERE. If you’d like to get an orange Poe instead, email me at kristereide@gmail.com  The final is due this week and I was thinking of adding some background.

screen-shot-2016-10-03-at-8-46-34-amRed Bubble is pretty easy to set up for all types of gifts and merchandise. I can see why artists like it so much.  Poe pillow anyone?

By the Light of the Moon – Pastel Painting

By Animals, art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Drawing, Illustration, Painting, Pastels, SCBWI No Comments

I had a great time in a 1-day pastel workshop at the Cole Art Studio. I used Nupastels on LaCarte paper for this painting of a dik dik, a small antelope that lives in Africa.  I worked on this in the afternoon.

HornbillIn the morning, I painted an African hornbill.

Pastels seem almost effortless. I’m looking forward to doing more.

Moorehead and Doubleday – Rabbits and More

By Animals, Children's book illustration, Fantasy, GNSI, Graphite, Illustration, Painting, Pastels No Comments

Meet Moorehead (left) and Doubleday (right). They’re a work in progress. I haven’t completely decided their back story yet. The sketch was colored in with CarbOthello pastel pencils (I like them) on Canson Mi Teintes paper. I just got a pack of La Carte and also Sennelier soft pastels and will be experimenting with those too.

I’m going to take a one day pastels workshop with Janis Graves this weekend through Cole Gallery and looking forward to it. I’ll paste a sample of her art below.

Janis-Graves-birdsThe Guild of Natural Science Illustrators also posted the group mural that I worked on at the Santa Cruz Conference.

There were 3. Here’s the one I drew a little egret (corner right) catching a fish. It’s on exhibit at the Sanctuary Exploration Center that’s part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It was a great conference.

 

 

 

gnsi-mural

Coloring Drawings and More from the SCBWI Exhibit in Seattle

By Animals, art school, Children, Children's book illustration, Color, digital, Drawing, Illustration, Mixed Media, SCBWI No Comments

I’m experimenting more with different ways to color drawings. The IpadPro, Apple Pencil, and the $5.99 app  Procreate make the process more like traditional painting.

Screen Shot 2016-07-10 at 11.05.52 AMAt left is my original homework assignment Mastering the Pencil.

By printing, I can also use traditional media like watercolor and pastel and not have to worry about destroying the original.

I also wanted to post some of the beautiful work at the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators exhibit that’s open at the Washington State Convention Center until September.

The artists are, respectively, Kelly Patton, Jessixa Bagley, and Hannah Stephens.

fox-woodbixley-kite

snow-queen-scbwi

 

 

Society of Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit in July – I’m In

By Animals, art school, birds, Children, Children's book illustration, digital, Drawing, Fantasy, Gage Academy, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

horatio-color3I just heard today that Hornblower During the Crisis has been accepted in the SCBWI Western Washington Illustrators Exhibit at the Washington State Convention Center! This will be my first juried group exhibition. It  runs from July 1- September 30th. I also just dropped off  some art for the Best of the Gage Exhibition. The exhibition and sale there is June 17th, and of course the Clymer Museum exhibition goes through June 25th.

In addition to school, I’ve been experimenting with different ways of adding color. This past week I did some colored pencil work with the black and white owl and frog drawing. I like really like Faber-Castell Polychromos. They are oil-based, so blend with baby oil and can work side-by-side with watercolor paints or pencils.

Krister-Eide-Frog-Owl-Colored-Pencils-2crowI’ve also been doing some sketching and thinking about doing some illustrations for Hans Christian Anderson’s Snow Queen. There are two good crow characters that are part of the story so I thought it would be nice to do. We get a lot of crow visitors in the backyard.

I also saw an inspiring video today. Sargy Mann is a painter who became blind when he was his 30’s. See his story below.

 

Owl and Frog Ink Illustration

By Animals, art school, birds, Composition, Graphite, Illustration, RMCAD No Comments

Just finished this – it’s my last week in Basic Illustration. It’s been a great class. It’s been a learning curve going to ink from pencil. The assignment was to choose a fortune cookie fortune and make a drawing from it. My fortune was “You are wise to keep your eyes open at all times.”

We weren’t allowed to use ink washes so it was a change for me as I had to focus on line art.

The ink drawing was first done in pencil then inked using micron pens, a Lamy fountain pen, and a little Copic marker for blocking in the grass. I also use Duralar mylar which helped a lot with my learning curve for ink. Duralar is very forgiving with ink – because it erases cleanly with alcohol or the colorless Copic marker blender.

My pencil draft is below.

Krister-Owl-Frog-Pencil-Final

Turkey Vulture in Watercolor – Show at the Clymer Museum !

By Animals, birds, gouache, Illustration, Mixed Media, Museum, Painting, RMCAD, watercolor No Comments

Turkey-Vulture-Watercolor-Krister-EideHere’s a watercolor portrait of a turkey vulture that I finished. Finished him time to be able to show him in the Natures Call Show at the Clymer Museum in Ellensburg. Thanks to Justin Gibbens and Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Northwest for making it all possible.

It’ll be my first show. I’ll also have an elk cow and crow in the exhibition. We’ll be driving out on the first Friday, May 6th, 5-7 pm. Food & Wine will be by Springboard Winery and music will be provided by the Lincoln Elementary School Music Club.
clymer-museum-show

Sketching to Tell a Story

By Children, Children's book illustration, Drawing, Graphite, Illustration, People, Portraits, RMCAD, Technique No Comments

fairytale-girlThis Christmas break, I’ve been doing more sketching to improve my skills. I’m trying to make each single piece tell more of a story and I’m also working on more backgrounds and landscape elements.  For my birthday, I went sketching at the zoo (cold, but could be worse) and took some advice from David Rankin who wrote the book Fast Sketching Techniques. I heard about him from a wildlife Screen Shot 2015-12-27 at 10.38.03 AMartist that I admire. He made the distinction between drawing and sketching – and pointed out the frustration of wanting to draw from wildlife, but difficult because it’s always moving.

We started some of the exercises in the book and put some of his advice into practice at the zoo. I still would like to touch up some of the sketches I did there, but’ll I’ll share them in a future post. He recommended staying longer with one animal and taking in all the little mannerisms. It becomes easier after you’ve drawn the same animal many times from different positions and doing different things.

The drawing of the girl is from a foreign movie based on a children’s fairytale. The man with the mustache is more my own invention and I titled it Admonition.  The other photo is a sketch of Albert Schweitzer from a vintage photo.

admonition
 albert

Blue Kangaroo and Coopers Hawk

By Animals, Painting, Technique 4 Comments

2015-02-22 10.06.22-Coopers-Hawkblue-kangaroo-krister-finalHere’s  blue kangaroo that I finished from my trip to the zoo. I found out that I’m probably using too little water and paint in my gouache. I had assumed that letting the paint dry up was fine as it can be reconstituted with water, but I found out that that’s not the case. I’m working on a portrait now and hope to have something to show soon.

I’m color mixing more now.

This beautiful Cooper’s hawk was on our neighbor’s roof this morning. Coopers and sharp-shinned hawks are pretty similar except I think this is a Cooper because of his big head. Here’s a close up of his head. I wish I had a little larger zoom lens, but this was still pretty cool.coopers-hawk-closeup

Painting the Unseen – Rene Magritte’s La Liberateur

By Art History, Surrealism No Comments

I’ve been a fan of Magritte since I was a kid (see Halloween costume, bottom), so I jumped at the chance to write on Magritte’s La Liberateur for my weekly Comp assignment. The assignment was to first describe the work so that someone who hadn’t seen it could picture it, then to do a formal analysis.  (An aside: Still painting every day, but nothing to share yet)

Magritte-La-Liberateur“The mind loves the unknown. It loves images whose meaning is unknown, since the meaning of the mind itself is unknown.” – Rene Magritte

René Magritte’s 1947 painting Le Liberateur is a bold depiction of the subconscious mind. The subject of this painting (fig. 1) is a seated figure wearing a straw hat, a bright red shawl, a neatly-tailored pair of trousers, and a pair of black leather shoes. His head and torso have been replaced with a card or parchment with 4 silhouettes on it, similar to the traditional “4 of clubs” design: a key, a goblet, a dove or pigeon in flight, and a tobacco pipe. His left hand rests on the handle of a bamboo cane; his right hand carries a strange object consisting of an elaborate, symmetrical, pearl-inlaid structure which has the eyes and mouth of a beautiful woman, attached to a large grey base similar to the base of a candelabra. The man rests on a rock formation by a dirt path, and a standard brown leather suitcase lies on the ground by his right foot.

Behind the figure is a lush, wooded landscape with a winding river. In the upper half of the painting, the sky is fragmented into numerous blocky arches, which retain the colors and gradient of a daytime sky. Cumulus clouds of various sizes drift through the arches. Behind the arches, a starry night sky is visible, yet the lighting on the other elements in the painting (the background, the figure, etc.) comes from the sunlit sky seen on the arches.

At first glance, the painting might seem completely absurd or nonsensical. The viewer is treated to multiple unexplained images that are at once familiar and unfamiliar. Human figures are combined with inanimate objects, the sky is at once daytime and nighttime, and seemingly unrelated visual signifiers are combined in ways that suggest relationships.

To better understand Le Liberateur, and Magritte’s work in general, it is important to recognize that painting was made at a time when society was increasingly influenced by the neurologist Sigmund Freud’s theories of the subconscious. René Magritte was a member of the Surrealist movement, a group of artists and intellectuals, founded by André Breton, who wished to explore how the mind could be trained into new forms of creativity.

Attempting to represent the workings of the subconscious presents unique challenges, as the subconscious is, by definition, not consciously perceived. Magritte used several visual tactics in order to represent the subconscious. One tactic is the use of recurring imagery. Several of the specific combinations of imagery in Le Liberateur turn up in other Magritte paintings; variations of the central figure are the focus of Magritte’s Le Therapeute series of paintings,[1] [2] while the pearly face is the subject of his Scheherazade series of paintings, [3] [4] and appears in his 1947 painting Les Grands Rendez-vous,[5] which also contains the same four symbols as seen on the “body” of the central figure in Le Liberateur. Other recurring images are less specific, and occur in many different permutations throughout Magritte’s work: doves/pigeons (e.g. Clairvoyance (1936),[6] Le Retour (1940),[7] Night of Love (1947),[8] Man in a Bowler Hat (1964),[9] etc.), tobacco pipes (e.g. La Lampe Philosophique (1936),[10] La Trahison des Images (1948),[11] The Cripple (c. 1948),[12] La Bonne Foi (1965),[13] etc.) and cumulus clouds in blue skies (e.g. Le Faux Miroir (1928),[14] Megalomania (1948),[15] Les Valeurs Personnelles (1952),[16] Decalcomania (1966),[17] etc.). The combinations of the seemingly unrelated familiar objects also evokes the workings of the subconscious mind; it illustrates how it is able to form connections between concepts and events that are not immediately obvious to the conscious mind.

In closing, I feel that Magritte was at least partially successful in conveying how the subconscious mind can affect our understanding of reality. Examining Magritte’s work in detail encouraged me to think about how the subconscious mind can form complex connections between various life experiences. And, in keeping with the original mission of the Surrealists, it made me consider how I can harness my subconscious mind to help fuel my conscious creativity.

[1] Various, “The Therapeutist I,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-therapeutist-1937

[2] Various, “The Therapeutist II,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-therapeutist

[3] Various, “Scheherazade I,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/sheherazade

[4] Various, “Scheherazade II,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/sheherazade-1950

[5] Author unknown, “Les grands rendez-vous: René Magritte Auction,” Artnet, date last    modified unknown, http://www.artnet.com/artists/ren%C3%A9-magritte/les-grands-     rendez-vous-qU09Ypet55WMizD8Rrvn3g2.

[6] Various, “Clairvoyance,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/clairvoyance-self-portrait-1936

[7] Various, “The Return,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-return-1940

[8] Various, “Night of Love,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/not_detected_211392

[9] Various, “Man in a Bowler Hat,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/man-in-a-bowler-hat-1964

[10] Various, “The Philosopher’s Lamp,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/philosopher-s-lamp-1936

[11] Various, “The Treachery of Images,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-treachery-of-images-this-is-not-a-pipe-1948

[12] Various, “The Maimed,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-maimed

[13] Various, “Good Faith,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/good-faith-1965

[14] Various, “The False Mirror,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-false-mirror-1928

[15] Various, “Delusions of Grandeur,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/delusions-of-grandeur-1948

[16] Various, “Personal Values,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/personal-values-1952

[17] Various, “Decalcomania,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/decalcomania-1966

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Gallery Visit Today – Artist Lynda Lowe

By Mixed Media, Painting 4 Comments

lynda-lowe-2lynda-lowe-1I visited a neat solo exhibition today – Lynda Lowe at Abmeyer + Wood near Pike Place Market in Seattle. She had beautiful mixed media pieces with watercolor, oil, and wax on wood. The title of the show was Resonance and her figures of birds or objects seemed to resonate from mathematical symbols and scaffolding. The gallery told me that she’s a local artist.

We also visited the Patricia Rovzar Gallery. I especially liked some of the artwork there made out of ‘found’ materials. I’m going to try and visit galleries more on a regular basis.

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