Category

Illustration

My Free Visual Storytelling From Your Imagination Course on Skillshare

By art school, digital, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, Illustration, Skillshare No Comments

I have a new class! It’s called Visual Storytelling from Your Imagination

 

I’m teaching it on Skillshare HERE

If you click on the link above, you’ll be able to watch the class for FREE AND get 2 months free of Skillshare Premium where you can choose from thousands of other classes for creatives. They will ask for your credit card to get the 2 month free trial, but as long as you cancel before the time’s up, you won’t be charged for anything.

Procreate is the most affordable professional-level drawing and painting program for the iPad. When combined with the Apple Pencil , it’s a pretty effortless art-creating experience.

In my class, I go from first sketches to final illustration and talk about composition, design, and inspiration. Using the affordable, yet professional-level app Procreate, I’ll show you how to bring your digital drawing and painting to life. This class is suitable for all levels of artists, including complete beginners.

if you upload projects in the project area, I’ll comment and give you helpful feedback!

Here are a few more details about the class:

1. CHOOSE A FANTASY SCENE TO ILLUSTRATE.  Would you like to create a dragon rider like me or another fantasy scene?  If you don’t know where to start, check out my suggestions for inspiration and brainstorming in Lesson 1.

2. FIND REFERENCES. Hunting for references an important part of my creative process.  I’ll give you my favorite tips for findings ideas and organizing visual references. How do you find references for things that don’t exist? I’ll have plenty of answers for you in Lesson2.

3. FIRST SKETCHES AND THUMBNAILS. Commit yourself to drawing out different ideas. Don’t worry if things are ugly. It’s fine for things to look ugly at this stage. We’ll discuss thumbnails, composition, rule of thirds, and positive and negative space.

4. COLOR, LAYERS, SHADING, and DETAILS. This is a fun stage to work on. We’ll add color and I’ll share tips that you might want to consider when choosing colors that work together in harmony. This video will also talk about special brushes and Procreate’s blending modes that can help with painting more realistic people, animals, and clothing. I’ll be showing you some nifty tricks with clipping masks that will help you finalize your forms and you’ll see your realistic 3d drawings emerge out of your 2d sketch!

5. FINAL TOUCHES: LIGHTING, LAYERS, TEXTURES, and STORY  This final video will show you how to make decisions about lighting (screen, soft light, hard light, multiply, etc), varying colors and tools to try new ideas to really make the scene come alive.  We’ll also think about the final storytelling details for your piece. These details help people want to know more and really get into your world.

Here’s an intro I made for the course:

Art Adventures at Comic Cons

By Children, Children's book illustration, Comics, Conventions, Illustration No Comments

Krister Eide at Norwescon 42 Comic Con
This past weekend was Norwescon 42, a great science fiction – fantasy convention that takes place in Seattle. I’m early on in my adventures as an artist in comic cons, but it has been a great experience.

It was inspiring to be in an art show with so many artists I admire. I also ended up selling 10 prints and a large digital canvas and to cap it off, I was able to have my portfolio reviewed by Guest of Honor Tran Nguyen, Scott Douwes, Bryan Syme, and Chelsea Santamaria! They were all super positive and had great practical advice about how to make some of my portfolio pieces better. I also went to a bunch of great panels that ranged from world building to writing children’s books and empathy in characters. Probably about 100 people or so took my business cards.

This is my third con. The first show I ever attended was the San  Diego Comic Con Art Show. I didn’t even have a badge to get into the convention proper, but the art show didn’t require it. The next con was a local con, Radcon, another science fiction fantasy convention that takes place in Pasco, WA. They have a mail order option for artists, and was also happy to find out that I sold just about half of the prints that I sent.

I’m still on a huge learning curve for these, but I can’t say enough about what a great experience they are. It’s great to get to meet and enjoy the artwork of fellow artists, but also connect with people who like my illustrations. I’m grateful to the professional artists who took the time to give me helpful feedback.

I’m graduating soon, and I’m looking forward to finally working full time on my own projects. I’ve already heard that I can send pieces to Orycon in Oregon, Bubonicon in New Mexico, and Armadillocon in Texas this summer and Fall. My next step is to have enough material for an artist alley – and of course I’ll still be working on my picture book dummy.

ADVICE FOR ARTIST NEWBIES CONSIDERING THEIR FIRST COMIC CONVENTIONS AND ART SHOWS

If any of you have any questions about conventions, just ask me.  The easiest conventions for artists to send work to are those where the organization running the con collect the taxes. Conventions in California still require registering with the Board of Equalization, but it’s pretty straightforward.

There are some great blog posts and videos out there about resources for artists alleys. Here are some of my favorites:

Naomi Van Doren at 1 Fantastic Week Traveling to Conventions By Plan (how she packs)

Based on what I learned from many other con artists, I prefer to print at 11×14 inches and sell prints with a backing board in a clear bag. Sometimes if you have too many sizes, your end up paying more for supplies and the bookkeeping can be more difficult.

If I have a lot of prints to make and have time, I will order through Cat Print. If you click at the link, you will get $10 off your first order and I will get a similar coupon. I recommend getting the free hard copy proofs to adjust the exposure. The majority of prints I ordered were great, but a few were underexposed and dull. When I contacted support, they sent a return label and credited me for them or offered a 30% off a new order.

After getting to know it better, we finally love our Artisan Epson 1430 printer. The print quality can be great, but it’s also dependent on the paper you choose and buying cartridges can be very costly. At a CTNX convention, I spoke to an artist who was at the Red River Paper booth. He told me about CISinks.com. YMMV, but I only wish I had discovered this sooner. You can dramatically reduce your prices per print with this continuous ink system and also make color and exposure adjustments that otherwise could be expensive with an outside printer. I initially bought Red River paper, but their matte paper catches in the Artisan 1430 (I learned about other artists who had this problem). Instead, Finestra Premium Matte is a terrific paper, it feeds smoothly and it’s less expensive too. I just set the printer on Epson Photo Quality and had great results.

Other Convention Print Supplies

Clear Storage Bags
Backing Boards

The nice thing about comic cons is that without too much $ up front, you can promote your work to prospective fans, clients, and art directors, sell some work, and get to know other artists and creatives. There are a lot of differences between cons (some are more popular entertainment oriented, others are more literary, and others more arts-focused ), but there’s a wide variety of art at these conventions and  with a little research, you can find the ones that suit you best. Some of the more popular cons are getting harder to get in (need to jury in), but many are still first-come, first-serve.

For more information about getting started in cons, check out
1 Fantastic Week
3 Point Perspective Podcast
Artist Alley Network International on Facebook

 

 

Home Stretch on my BFA – More Squids

By Animals, art school, Children, Children's book illustration, Comics, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, SCBWI No Comments

Dustcover-no-title

Hard to believe it, but I’m finally on the homestretch on my BFA. I just finished Children’s Book Illustration II and I only have my graduation portfolio to go.

I’ve been working revising my Captain Nemo the great horned owl and Professor Arronax’s trusty research assistant Consay the badger has also gotten a little rehab.

I’ve got more illustrations to show you. The best thing about the past few weeks is that I have a animal picture book dummy on 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea that’s finally coming together!

Baby Raven and Two More Shows!

By birds, Children's book illustration, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, GNSI, Illustration No Comments

It’s still intense baby time in the wildcare center. First time I had a chance to take care of a raven. He’s still a baby at 6 weeks old, but he’s huge compared to the crows. 

We also admitted a hummingbird with an injured wing.

A duckling we had with an injured foot, got better over the course of a week and was released to another center with several other similarly aged ducklings.

I forgot to share my photos from my group show in Laguna Beach. It was a blast! I’m so glad I didn’t miss it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’l’ll have one piece (my turkey vulture painted in gouache) in another group exhibition that’s going up June 30th at the Washington State Convention Center with my fellow artists with the Northwest Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. The show will be open from June 30th-September 25th. I think there will be an opening reception. I’ll post it when I know the details.

Also, very exciting – I was accepted to San Diego Comic Con so I’ll be going down next month! There will be 150,000 attendees, so pretty overwhelming. Now I’m working hard to touch up some pieces before the event.

Dragon Rider

By Animals, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Dragon, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art, Painting, People, SCBWI No Comments


I just had this postcard made up in time for the SCBWI Publisher’s Bootcamp this weekend. There’s going to a talks by local agents and art director Goldstein from Sasquatch books and a 4 minute pitch round where I’ll get a chance to pitch a book idea.

SCBWI Western Washington has been a great branch of the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators helping people learn more about book publishing and hopefully get published themselves.

NYC Trip and Sargent Master Copy

By Animals, Children's book illustration, digital, Fantasy, Illustration, Painting, Portraits One Comment

My trip to New York city was great!  It started off with a trip to the Society of Illustrators which was pretty amazing itself because of its collection (see Peter de Seve‘s owl).

We had portolio reviews there and then Scholastic!  I’ve long been a fan of Arthur Levine Books, so it was an experience showing my work to Editor Weslie Turner. She said it was a great portfolio overall, but she wanted to see if I could bring the emotions and movements of my animal characters to kids – so I have more work to do.

I also spent hours at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and even some of the Frick collection. As it should happen, at the same time, I had assignment to do a Singer Sargent master copy. At right is a portrait I painted digitally of Julia inspired by Sargent’s The Daughters of Darley Boit. The more I looked, the more colors I saw. I tried to capture that piercing look that so many of Sargent’s paintings have.

I also got to see the Broadway show Aladdin while I was there. It also was great. A friend of my parents even knew some members of the cast.

Tomorrow I’ll be heading down to California for the Comics, Anime, Cartoons, and Fantasy show at Las Laguna Gallery. Here’s the flyer!  Say hello if you stop by. I plan to be there from 6:30-9:30 by my painting (Squid Attack on the Nautilus). More information can be found here. The show will be up from April 5-27th.

Spring – New Animals in Our Wildcare Center

By Illustration, Mixed Media, Painting, Photoshop No Comments

Here’s a newborn baby Douglas squirrel. Their nest was found broken on the ground with no other babies or mom in sight. We think it may have been a predator.

We also have 6 Western cottontails and a new screech owl. The last screech owl has recovered well and has been released.

 

 

I’m in Digital Illustration II now and we’re doing practicing realistic techniques. Not as fun as narrative illustrations, but I’m definitely picking up some new things. I had a great trip to New York City – I’ll post that later this week. The smaller picture is the photo reference.

 

 

 

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Octopus Card

By art school, Children's book illustration, digital, Drawing, Fantasy, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

I just finished this playing card today. It’s an octopus holding Captain Nemo’s Nautilus as the Ace of Spades. I had fun making this.

Next month I’m going to be going to New York City with other illustrators and my department chair. We’re going to be visiting museums and the Society of Illustrators and have some portfolio reviews.

Since I posted, I’ve also joined a SCBWI critique group and getting a picture book dummy together for 20,000 Leagues.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Book Cover

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, Painting, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

Eide-Twenty-Thousand-Leagues-dec3I just turned in this illustration last week for Illustrating Literature class. It  continues some ideas I have about Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea with Animals. I learned a lot more about painting water, textures, and lighting on this one and this week I’m working on more sequential illustrations from the story.

It’s been so busy, I haven’t had a chance to post to the blog, but I had an incredible time at #CTNexpo2017. I’ll have to follow up in other posts, but one of the sessions I went to was on publishing. Many of the artists at this expo were involved at least some point in huge animations studios like Disney, Dreamworks, Pixar, Blue Sky. Greg Manchess and Armand Baltzar talked about how they had a dream of getting their artwork and stories into book form, although they didn’t clearly fit into either picture books or graphic novels. The result is Greg’s Above the Timberline and Armand’s Timeless.

Here’s an example from Greg’s book. The inset is a personalized inscription he gave me.

manchess

Here’s an example from Armand’s book:

armand

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

By Animals, birds, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art, SCBWI One Comment

I’ve finally had chance to work more on an animal version of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Captain Nemo is a Great Horned Owl, Professor Aronnax is a rabbit and his dedicated servant Conseil is a badger.

I’m also working on a picture book dummy for my children’s book illustration class. I’ve chosen the Velveteen rabbit.

I’m really enjoying children’s book illustration class and my local SCBWI chapter told me that the wonderful children’s book illustrator Jerry Pinkney will be in Seattle next week at the US Board on Books for Young People conference. He’s also going to be signing books at the Secret Garden bookstore. I’ll try to report on the conference here. The illustrators and authors are pretty incredible. There’s also a pre-conference tour that University of Washington is giving of their special collection of children’s book illustrations.

Last weekend when I was working at the wildlife rehab center, we got to see a very cute saw-whet owl. I think he had been hit by a car, but seems to be recovering well.

 

 

 

 

Wordless Picture Books

By art school, Children's book illustration, Color, Composition, Fantasy, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI One Comment

This past week, we were studying wordless picture books. Here is my discussion post answering questions such as some favorite wordless picture books and whether we thought wordless picture books could be improved with words or vice-versa, whether there were picture books with words that could published as wordless.

A prime contender for my favorite wordless picture book is Shaun Tan’s The Arrival. It tells a metaphorical story about the immigrant experience, with a poor man leaving home on a steamship in order to support his family, and finding himself in a bizarre new world. Many aspects of immigration are reflected: confusion, frustration, tedious manual labor, and the dangers of war, but also the joys of making new friends, discovering new experiences, and finding ways to support the people you love. The world of The Arrival is visually set in the early 20th century, and the art style is modeled after the sepia photographs of those periods, making the strange creatures and environments feel all the more otherworldly. The lack of words helps to make the reader’s connection with the immigrant protagonist all the more direct, as he struggles to figure out an often difficult to comprehend new environment. In Tan’s own words, “Words have a remarkable magnetic pull on our attention, and how we interpret attendant images: in their absence, an image can often have more conceptual space around it, and invite a more lingering attention from a reader who might otherwise reach for the nearest convenient caption, and let that rule their imagination.”

arrival-1

arrival-2

A wordless picture book that I haven’t read in its entirety, but is pretty good from what I’ve seen, is Journey by Aaron Becker. I like it because of its sense of wonder, and its simple, positive message about creative works can break boundaries and reach out to other people. The lack of words in this book, again, helps to place the reader in the protagonist’s place, as they discover the possibilities of their creativity over the story’s course.

journey-2

I kind of can’t name any wordless books that I think would be improved by words. Wordless picture books have their own strengths as a format; they have a certain element of discovery to them, as the reader pieces together events without the aid of a narrative text. There are some books could be adapted pretty simply, if not necessarily improved, into effective wordless books. Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are comes to mind, as do some of Beatrix Potter’s works.

I’m starting my picture book dummy based on the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. I could tell the gist of the plot of the story without words, but I feel like some nuances, such as the point the Skin Horse makes about toys becoming real, would be at least partially lost.

Storyboard a Classic – Adventures in Children’s Book Illustration

By birds, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI 4 Comments

Here’s last week’s assignment for Children’s Book Illustration I. It was pretty fun.

It had to be very short, so I chose the Aesop’s Fable The Fox and the Crow. I added color to a few of the storyboards to suggest colors.

 

 

 

 

p.s. Here’s Jay Jay, a rescue bird where I work in Snohomish. Handsome bird.

Sequential Art – Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?

By Animals, art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art 3 Comments

I just had my first week of Children’s Book Illustration 1 at RMCAD and the first assignment was to develop a few several concept sketch comics in 3 panels on the theme of: Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?

It was a nice first assignment to ease into thinking about sketching from a visual storytelling perspective vs. drawing single sketches.

 

The last one was probably my favorite. This week we’re drawing a mini book dummy for an Aesop’s fable.

Last night, we also had our opening of the Fantastical Worlds Art Show at Blakely Hall in  Issaquah Highlands. It was exciting to have my 20,000 Leagues with Rabbits and Outside Looking In works hanging along the others! The show will be up for the next two months. Drop by if you have a chance!  It was nice to see other members of Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrations – Western Washington there, too.

I Won a Charlene Cosgrove Memorial Scholarship !

By Animals, Children's book illustration, gouache, Illustration, Painting, RMCAD, watercolor 2 Comments

I just found out today that I won a Charlene Cosgrove Memorial Scholarship at my university, Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design!  It was very unexpected.  It’s $825 that I can put toward tuition.

I submitted this painting a marbled murrelet (it’s actually still a WIP – some things I need to clean up) done in gouche and transparent watercolor and the crow that I recently posted here on the blog and Gerda from the Snow Queen (below).

There was also a writing prompt with the scholarship and I had a chance to write on a Japanese artist Tabaimo who recently had an exhibition at the Asian Art Museum here in Seattle.

The question we were to write about was whether we thought the context of the artist was important for a full appreciation and understanding of art. For me, the context of the art is very important.

I’ll post my paper below for anyone who might be interested. Also here’s a short video interview with Tabaimo talking about the exhibition.

 

Scholarship paper here.

I’m in the Fantastical Worlds and Put a Bird on It Exhibitions!

By Animals, birds, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, gouache, Illustration, kids lit art, Mixed Media, Painting 3 Comments

I’m excited to share that I’ve juried in two art pieces in the Fantastical Worlds Exhibition at Blakely Hall.  The curator is Anna Macrae and the event was organized by ArtEast. I am thrilled and honored. There are some amazing artists in the show. Put it on your calendar. The opening reception is September 7th at Blakely Hall in Issaquah 6-8 pm.  The art should be up until the beginning of November.

Here is my Art Statement for the show:

Animals have always captured my imagination. They come with a wild array of forms, colors, sounds, and with them an inner world we can only see faint traces of, and can never fully understand.  Focusing on animals in my work always seemed natural to me, expressing emotions and worlds outside our understanding.

“Outside Looking In” is a somewhat personal piece, capturing a moment in time between two worlds. The piece started from random pourings of blue ink on paper, which formed an appealing landscape; the rest was filled in digitally.

“20,000 Leagues Under the Sea with Rabbits” is a lighthearted piece, which attempts to capture that sense of wonder and mystery I’ve always been drawn to, of entering a world you never knew you were missing.
Screen Shot 2017-08-15 at 9.18.14 AM

buzzard-blue-skyI was also happy to hear that my painting of Edgar (see right) made it into ArtEast’s Put a Bird On It show that opens this Thursday evening at the ArtEast Center (I’ll be there) and remains there until October 1st.

Smiling Crow and Wildlife Rehabilitation

By Animals, birds, Cute Animals, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

Smiling-crow-crop

 

Here’s a great commission that I had a chance to draw, a smiling crow. I haven’t had a chance to post, but now I’m taking Non-Western Art History. It’s passing pretty quickly (Haiti, India, China, Japan so far), but it’s been interesting.

At the beginning of summer, I also had a chance to start working in a small wildlife rehabilitation center. It’s been a great experience so far – mostly birds and small mammals. Here are two long-time residents, Hooligan and Eclipse  – both barred owls who aren’t able to be released because they have one wing. They are beautiful. It’s Hooligan who likes to talk.

[wpvideo R08eVJEd]

Drawing Horses, Elephants, Primates, and More

By Animals, Graphite, Illustration 4 Comments

We’re continuing to draw our way through the animal kingdom. Each week’s assignment follows the same pattern – block out the geometric shapes, then draw animal gestures. We’re also doing a skeleton study and ecorche / muscle drawing, so it’s busy. Having done an ecorche for each group helps in making a fantasy hybrid animal (WIP). These are just a few of the sketches from the past weeks.

 

 

Sketching Bears, Wolves, and Dogs

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Drawing, Illustration No Comments

This week’s assignment are gestures of bears, wolves, and dogs. Using a envelope for the animals and simplifying geometric shapes helps with simplifying. The class is setting into a routine of drawing gestures with a little value added in some, skeleton and ecorche version, and discussion post which looks at different rendering of animals characters and how they can be portrayed as protagonists or antagonists in a story. It’s fun seeing the examples that my classmates come up with.

I’m finding I really like drawing with the Procreate app on the iPad pro and Apple pencil. It’s close to drawing with a real pencil. When I want this soft effect with pencil, I usually prefer to use mylar (Dura-lar) which comes in huge rolls from Dick Blick and erases cleanly.

bearslittle-polar-bearwolves

labrador-1labrador-2labrador-3

My discussion post:
There’s some amount of range when it comes to how sympathetically bear characters are portrayed. On the sympathetic side, there are characters such as teddy bears, and related characters such as the Care Bears and Winnie the Pooh, which are modeled more on the stuffed animal than the actual animal.

poohlitte-bear

More realistic sympathetic bears include Baloo from any of the multiple adaptations of The Jungle Book, Smokey the Bear, and the bear family of Maurice Sendak’s Little Bear.

On the more antipathetic side, there are characters such as the bear in the film version of The Fox and the Hound, and the grizzly bear from the film Balto, which are portrayed as bestial, inhuman predators.

When wolves are portrayed positively, they tend to come off as majestic, intelligent, loyal, embodying the nobility of nature; the wolf family in The Jungle Book, Moro in Princess Mononoke.

wolf-3

 

Negatively, wolves are portrayed as crafty predators, as with the classical fairytale archetype of the Big Bad Wolf.

 

 

wolf-4The main example I can think of when it comes to neutral/background characters is how, in Donald Duck etc. comics, otherwise “human” side/background characters tend to be given dog noses, and occasionally ears. Here, the use of animal characteristics basically just signifies that these stories take place in a completely unreal fantasy world.
In general, I would say that completely realistic renderings of animals, as you might find in an educational book, often have less strong emotional expressivity, and are less immediately emotionally accessible as a result. Even mostly realistic designs often “cheat” when it comes to faces, adding human elements such as humanoid scleras, eyebrow muscles, and mouth expressions.

Big Cats – Animal Anatomy and Drawing

By Animals, digital, Drawing, Graphite, Illustration, RMCAD No Comments

I had my first week of Animal Anatomy and Drawing and the assignments were all on Big Cats. Last week I also had a chance to go to Cougar Mountain, a small zoo in Issaquah. We shot some nice photo reference, though.

The first assignment was to break down the animals into 3D geometric shapes. It was a bit hard at first, but I can see that it helps simplify and visualizes the 3D forms when you see them in the live animals. The idea of drawing the envelope is to get the general shape of the animal or figure before working on details. Here are some of my gesture drawings. For me, it’s easier working out the forms when watching a video loop of animals moving. The book for the course is Joe Weatherly’s Drawing Animals. We also had to do skeleton and ecorche versions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Experience at SCBWI-WWA Spring Conference

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Composition, Cute Animals, Illustration, kids lit art, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

I had a great time at our Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Spring Conference. It was neat to be with such an enthusiastic group that were all interested in children’s books. I liked all of the speakers, but especially David Small and Kazu Kibuishi who shared a lot of their personal stories about how they came to be motivated to do the work they do. David Small is Caldecott winner and Kazu is a writer and illustrator of graphic novels like the Amulet and Explorer.

This was the first time I put together a portfolio. I searched on the web for examples of how to set one up. I use an inexpensive photo album on Amazon that had a window in the cover.

I liked being able to present my work in the portfolio evening, but I also liked seeing everyone else’s work. I’m thinking about doing more drawing with ferrets especially since my visit to the ferret rescue in Kirkland. Their fur is very soft. There were a lot of illustrators I also had a chance to discover. I especially liked Heidi Aubrey‘s mice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a week off, I’ll be starting animal anatomy and drawing (yay). I’m also a few weeks into volunteer orientation to work in wild bird rehabilitation – skills training starts in May.

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