Category

Fantasy

My Free Visual Storytelling From Your Imagination Course on Skillshare

By art school, digital, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, Illustration, Skillshare No Comments

I have a new class! It’s called Visual Storytelling from Your Imagination

 

I’m teaching it on Skillshare HERE

If you click on the link above, you’ll be able to watch the class for FREE AND get 2 months free of Skillshare Premium where you can choose from thousands of other classes for creatives. They will ask for your credit card to get the 2 month free trial, but as long as you cancel before the time’s up, you won’t be charged for anything.

Procreate is the most affordable professional-level drawing and painting program for the iPad. When combined with the Apple Pencil , it’s a pretty effortless art-creating experience.

In my class, I go from first sketches to final illustration and talk about composition, design, and inspiration. Using the affordable, yet professional-level app Procreate, I’ll show you how to bring your digital drawing and painting to life. This class is suitable for all levels of artists, including complete beginners.

if you upload projects in the project area, I’ll comment and give you helpful feedback!

Here are a few more details about the class:

1. CHOOSE A FANTASY SCENE TO ILLUSTRATE.  Would you like to create a dragon rider like me or another fantasy scene?  If you don’t know where to start, check out my suggestions for inspiration and brainstorming in Lesson 1.

2. FIND REFERENCES. Hunting for references an important part of my creative process.  I’ll give you my favorite tips for findings ideas and organizing visual references. How do you find references for things that don’t exist? I’ll have plenty of answers for you in Lesson2.

3. FIRST SKETCHES AND THUMBNAILS. Commit yourself to drawing out different ideas. Don’t worry if things are ugly. It’s fine for things to look ugly at this stage. We’ll discuss thumbnails, composition, rule of thirds, and positive and negative space.

4. COLOR, LAYERS, SHADING, and DETAILS. This is a fun stage to work on. We’ll add color and I’ll share tips that you might want to consider when choosing colors that work together in harmony. This video will also talk about special brushes and Procreate’s blending modes that can help with painting more realistic people, animals, and clothing. I’ll be showing you some nifty tricks with clipping masks that will help you finalize your forms and you’ll see your realistic 3d drawings emerge out of your 2d sketch!

5. FINAL TOUCHES: LIGHTING, LAYERS, TEXTURES, and STORY  This final video will show you how to make decisions about lighting (screen, soft light, hard light, multiply, etc), varying colors and tools to try new ideas to really make the scene come alive.  We’ll also think about the final storytelling details for your piece. These details help people want to know more and really get into your world.

Here’s an intro I made for the course:

Home Stretch on my BFA – More Squids

By Animals, art school, Children, Children's book illustration, Comics, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, SCBWI No Comments

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Hard to believe it, but I’m finally on the homestretch on my BFA. I just finished Children’s Book Illustration II and I only have my graduation portfolio to go.

I’ve been working revising my Captain Nemo the great horned owl and Professor Arronax’s trusty research assistant Consay the badger has also gotten a little rehab.

I’ve got more illustrations to show you. The best thing about the past few weeks is that I have a animal picture book dummy on 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea that’s finally coming together!

Baby Raven and Two More Shows!

By birds, Children's book illustration, Fantasy, Fantasy Illustration, GNSI, Illustration No Comments

It’s still intense baby time in the wildcare center. First time I had a chance to take care of a raven. He’s still a baby at 6 weeks old, but he’s huge compared to the crows. 

We also admitted a hummingbird with an injured wing.

A duckling we had with an injured foot, got better over the course of a week and was released to another center with several other similarly aged ducklings.

I forgot to share my photos from my group show in Laguna Beach. It was a blast! I’m so glad I didn’t miss it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’l’ll have one piece (my turkey vulture painted in gouache) in another group exhibition that’s going up June 30th at the Washington State Convention Center with my fellow artists with the Northwest Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. The show will be open from June 30th-September 25th. I think there will be an opening reception. I’ll post it when I know the details.

Also, very exciting – I was accepted to San Diego Comic Con so I’ll be going down next month! There will be 150,000 attendees, so pretty overwhelming. Now I’m working hard to touch up some pieces before the event.

Dragon Rider

By Animals, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Dragon, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art, Painting, People, SCBWI No Comments


I just had this postcard made up in time for the SCBWI Publisher’s Bootcamp this weekend. There’s going to a talks by local agents and art director Goldstein from Sasquatch books and a 4 minute pitch round where I’ll get a chance to pitch a book idea.

SCBWI Western Washington has been a great branch of the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators helping people learn more about book publishing and hopefully get published themselves.

NYC Trip and Sargent Master Copy

By Animals, Children's book illustration, digital, Fantasy, Illustration, Painting, Portraits One Comment

My trip to New York city was great!  It started off with a trip to the Society of Illustrators which was pretty amazing itself because of its collection (see Peter de Seve‘s owl).

We had portolio reviews there and then Scholastic!  I’ve long been a fan of Arthur Levine Books, so it was an experience showing my work to Editor Weslie Turner. She said it was a great portfolio overall, but she wanted to see if I could bring the emotions and movements of my animal characters to kids – so I have more work to do.

I also spent hours at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and even some of the Frick collection. As it should happen, at the same time, I had assignment to do a Singer Sargent master copy. At right is a portrait I painted digitally of Julia inspired by Sargent’s The Daughters of Darley Boit. The more I looked, the more colors I saw. I tried to capture that piercing look that so many of Sargent’s paintings have.

I also got to see the Broadway show Aladdin while I was there. It also was great. A friend of my parents even knew some members of the cast.

Tomorrow I’ll be heading down to California for the Comics, Anime, Cartoons, and Fantasy show at Las Laguna Gallery. Here’s the flyer!  Say hello if you stop by. I plan to be there from 6:30-9:30 by my painting (Squid Attack on the Nautilus). More information can be found here. The show will be up from April 5-27th.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Octopus Card

By art school, Children's book illustration, digital, Drawing, Fantasy, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

I just finished this playing card today. It’s an octopus holding Captain Nemo’s Nautilus as the Ace of Spades. I had fun making this.

Next month I’m going to be going to New York City with other illustrators and my department chair. We’re going to be visiting museums and the Society of Illustrators and have some portfolio reviews.

Since I posted, I’ve also joined a SCBWI critique group and getting a picture book dummy together for 20,000 Leagues.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Book Cover

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, Jules Verne, kids lit art, Painting, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

Eide-Twenty-Thousand-Leagues-dec3I just turned in this illustration last week for Illustrating Literature class. It  continues some ideas I have about Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea with Animals. I learned a lot more about painting water, textures, and lighting on this one and this week I’m working on more sequential illustrations from the story.

It’s been so busy, I haven’t had a chance to post to the blog, but I had an incredible time at #CTNexpo2017. I’ll have to follow up in other posts, but one of the sessions I went to was on publishing. Many of the artists at this expo were involved at least some point in huge animations studios like Disney, Dreamworks, Pixar, Blue Sky. Greg Manchess and Armand Baltzar talked about how they had a dream of getting their artwork and stories into book form, although they didn’t clearly fit into either picture books or graphic novels. The result is Greg’s Above the Timberline and Armand’s Timeless.

Here’s an example from Greg’s book. The inset is a personalized inscription he gave me.

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Here’s an example from Armand’s book:

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20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

By Animals, birds, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art, SCBWI One Comment

I’ve finally had chance to work more on an animal version of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Captain Nemo is a Great Horned Owl, Professor Aronnax is a rabbit and his dedicated servant Conseil is a badger.

I’m also working on a picture book dummy for my children’s book illustration class. I’ve chosen the Velveteen rabbit.

I’m really enjoying children’s book illustration class and my local SCBWI chapter told me that the wonderful children’s book illustrator Jerry Pinkney will be in Seattle next week at the US Board on Books for Young People conference. He’s also going to be signing books at the Secret Garden bookstore. I’ll try to report on the conference here. The illustrators and authors are pretty incredible. There’s also a pre-conference tour that University of Washington is giving of their special collection of children’s book illustrations.

Last weekend when I was working at the wildlife rehab center, we got to see a very cute saw-whet owl. I think he had been hit by a car, but seems to be recovering well.

 

 

 

 

Wordless Picture Books

By art school, Children's book illustration, Color, Composition, Fantasy, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI One Comment

This past week, we were studying wordless picture books. Here is my discussion post answering questions such as some favorite wordless picture books and whether we thought wordless picture books could be improved with words or vice-versa, whether there were picture books with words that could published as wordless.

A prime contender for my favorite wordless picture book is Shaun Tan’s The Arrival. It tells a metaphorical story about the immigrant experience, with a poor man leaving home on a steamship in order to support his family, and finding himself in a bizarre new world. Many aspects of immigration are reflected: confusion, frustration, tedious manual labor, and the dangers of war, but also the joys of making new friends, discovering new experiences, and finding ways to support the people you love. The world of The Arrival is visually set in the early 20th century, and the art style is modeled after the sepia photographs of those periods, making the strange creatures and environments feel all the more otherworldly. The lack of words helps to make the reader’s connection with the immigrant protagonist all the more direct, as he struggles to figure out an often difficult to comprehend new environment. In Tan’s own words, “Words have a remarkable magnetic pull on our attention, and how we interpret attendant images: in their absence, an image can often have more conceptual space around it, and invite a more lingering attention from a reader who might otherwise reach for the nearest convenient caption, and let that rule their imagination.”

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A wordless picture book that I haven’t read in its entirety, but is pretty good from what I’ve seen, is Journey by Aaron Becker. I like it because of its sense of wonder, and its simple, positive message about creative works can break boundaries and reach out to other people. The lack of words in this book, again, helps to place the reader in the protagonist’s place, as they discover the possibilities of their creativity over the story’s course.

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I kind of can’t name any wordless books that I think would be improved by words. Wordless picture books have their own strengths as a format; they have a certain element of discovery to them, as the reader pieces together events without the aid of a narrative text. There are some books could be adapted pretty simply, if not necessarily improved, into effective wordless books. Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are comes to mind, as do some of Beatrix Potter’s works.

I’m starting my picture book dummy based on the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. I could tell the gist of the plot of the story without words, but I feel like some nuances, such as the point the Skin Horse makes about toys becoming real, would be at least partially lost.

Sequential Art – Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?

By Animals, art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, Fantasy, Illustration, kids lit art 3 Comments

I just had my first week of Children’s Book Illustration 1 at RMCAD and the first assignment was to develop a few several concept sketch comics in 3 panels on the theme of: Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?

It was a nice first assignment to ease into thinking about sketching from a visual storytelling perspective vs. drawing single sketches.

 

The last one was probably my favorite. This week we’re drawing a mini book dummy for an Aesop’s fable.

Last night, we also had our opening of the Fantastical Worlds Art Show at Blakely Hall in  Issaquah Highlands. It was exciting to have my 20,000 Leagues with Rabbits and Outside Looking In works hanging along the others! The show will be up for the next two months. Drop by if you have a chance!  It was nice to see other members of Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrations – Western Washington there, too.

I’m in the Fantastical Worlds and Put a Bird on It Exhibitions!

By Animals, birds, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, gouache, Illustration, kids lit art, Mixed Media, Painting 3 Comments

I’m excited to share that I’ve juried in two art pieces in the Fantastical Worlds Exhibition at Blakely Hall.  The curator is Anna Macrae and the event was organized by ArtEast. I am thrilled and honored. There are some amazing artists in the show. Put it on your calendar. The opening reception is September 7th at Blakely Hall in Issaquah 6-8 pm.  The art should be up until the beginning of November.

Here is my Art Statement for the show:

Animals have always captured my imagination. They come with a wild array of forms, colors, sounds, and with them an inner world we can only see faint traces of, and can never fully understand.  Focusing on animals in my work always seemed natural to me, expressing emotions and worlds outside our understanding.

“Outside Looking In” is a somewhat personal piece, capturing a moment in time between two worlds. The piece started from random pourings of blue ink on paper, which formed an appealing landscape; the rest was filled in digitally.

“20,000 Leagues Under the Sea with Rabbits” is a lighthearted piece, which attempts to capture that sense of wonder and mystery I’ve always been drawn to, of entering a world you never knew you were missing.
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buzzard-blue-skyI was also happy to hear that my painting of Edgar (see right) made it into ArtEast’s Put a Bird On It show that opens this Thursday evening at the ArtEast Center (I’ll be there) and remains there until October 1st.

Western Washington SCBWI Spring Conference – This Week!

By Animals, art school, artists groups, Children, Children's book illustration, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, Illustration, SCBWI One Comment

I’m be  attending my first Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Conference this week in Redmond. I’m doing some tweaks to my portfolio (here’s my new improved Snow Queen) and printing up business cards and postcards.

I’m signed up for the Illustrator Intensive “Hard Things to Draw” with David Small (see some of his covers below) as well as participating in the Juried Portfolio show. I’m looking forward to seeing lots of portfolios and hearing from other illustrators and writers, art directors, and agents. I’ve heard these conferences are great for networking and getting started in children’s books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s my design for a business card: 

I’m also doing  film class this RMCAD quarter, so I’m putting together a short film discussion of the movie, Vertigo.

I had a great chance to interview author and film critic Jeffrey Overstreet and attorney and film lecturer Robert Cumbow, in addition to my family. I even attended a 6-hour Cinema Dissection of Vertigo at the Seattle International Film Festival Center which gave me an even deeper understanding of the film.

Deer Illustration Final and SCBWI Keep It Simple Art Show

By Animals, art school, Children's book illustration, Drawing, Fantasy, Illustration, ink, kids lit art, SCBWI No Comments

Here’s my finished (I think) ink wash illustration from my concept class. Now I’ve begun Still Life, so it’s back to paintbrushes.

I did want to share some photos from our Western Washington SCBWI Keep It Simple Show. I’m lucky that it’s such a great group. Everyone was very generous and it was incredibly helpful seeing other people’s work, their tear sheets, and business cards. I’ve put in links to their websites on their works below. Check them out to be inspired. The artists are David Joaquin and Liz Wong in the top row; Maja Sereda and Tracy Wallschaleger of Red Dog Images.

The keynote speaker for the night was Jennifer Soloway of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. She gave a fantastic talk on how to stand out from the slush pile, great first lines, and some of the ins and outs of being an artists’ representative.

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Inspiration – Process Thumbnails

By Abstract, Animals, art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Composition, Cute Animals, digital, Fantasy, Illustration, ink, kids lit art, People, SCBWI 2 Comments

It was busy for me last week. I’ll have to write about the SCBWI meeting in another post. Here are last week’s enlarged thumbnails from Concept Illustration. Up top is my Green Man and below Wish. I’m chose the deer thumbnail to elaborate this week.

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The other thumbnails based on the random ink – water mixes are posted below. To look at the original random ink mixes I was working with, see my previous post.

The guy at the bottom is my most atypical one – but it was the face that jumped out of ink splatters. Last week we also had an exercise in which we were to take a walk and sketch everything that we saw that was a particular color. Then we were to combine those in scenes. I can see how these exercises are creativity stretchers. I really like this class.

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Value Studies and Final Snow Queen Painting

By art school, Children, Children's book illustration, Color, Fantasy, Illustration, Mixed Media, Painting, People, watercolor No Comments

After sketching thumbnails for my Gerda vs. the Snow Queen’s Snow Bees painting, I created 3 quick 3-value thumbnails to decide on the final composition. I found it really helps separating out the composition and value decisions before committing to a final work. Because I wanted to base the painting on the original Hans Christian Andersen story, I also want to work in the detail that he had about the palace being lit by Northern Lights.

Although I liked the extremes of values in the value study, I settled on the 3rd study because I liked the idea that the shadows on the hill would be pointing to Gerda, my focal point. I added some hills in the background to create greater depth and also added more complex branchwork in the final.

I started out with pencil and watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, but finished the piece digitally using Procreate and an Ipad Pro because I could play around with different color combinations before deciding on a final. I really like Procreate and the Apple Pencil because the process of illustrating with them is so close to real pencil, paper, and paint – but with much more flexibility with materials and undo’s. I had an earlier version, but Phil my teacher and classmate China suggested good feedback about brightening up the colors among other things. Our next assignment should be fun – drawing caricatures. I’ve picked my subject already…Edgar Allan Poe.

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Sketching Scenes with Maquettes

By art school, birds, Children's book illustration, Composition, Fantasy, Illustration, Perspective, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

maquetteIn Concept Illustration, we have an assignment to design an illustration based on the broad theme of conflict (character vs character, character vs. environment etc). I’ve thought about doing illustrations from the original Snow Queen so on our thumbnail assignment, which was limited to black and white and approximately 1 x 2 inches.

I’ve always been inspired with James Gurney’s maquette work (here is his Skybax maquette made out of armature wire, sculpey, floral wire, and stockings covered with latex among other ingredients.

gurney-skybax-maquetteI liked being able to walk around the scene and vary the perspective – vertically and horizontally. I used armature wire and chavant clay which doesn’t harden.

I also had to have 2 color comps and three 3-color value sketches. My instructor picked thumbnail 3 so that’s the one I’m working on, but with more background added.

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Our discussion this past week was to collect illustrations that could be used as inspiration for creating your scene. I picked these great works by Sendak, Lathrop, and Dulac.

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Moorehead and Doubleday – Rabbits and More

By Animals, Children's book illustration, Fantasy, GNSI, Graphite, Illustration, Painting, Pastels No Comments

Meet Moorehead (left) and Doubleday (right). They’re a work in progress. I haven’t completely decided their back story yet. The sketch was colored in with CarbOthello pastel pencils (I like them) on Canson Mi Teintes paper. I just got a pack of La Carte and also Sennelier soft pastels and will be experimenting with those too.

I’m going to take a one day pastels workshop with Janis Graves this weekend through Cole Gallery and looking forward to it. I’ll paste a sample of her art below.

Janis-Graves-birdsThe Guild of Natural Science Illustrators also posted the group mural that I worked on at the Santa Cruz Conference.

There were 3. Here’s the one I drew a little egret (corner right) catching a fish. It’s on exhibit at the Sanctuary Exploration Center that’s part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It was a great conference.

 

 

 

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Guild of Natural Science Illustrators in Santa Cruz

By Animals, Drawing, Fantasy, GNSI, Illustration, Workshops No Comments

Here’s some photos from the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Annual Conference in Santa Cruz. It was great! It’s the first art conference I’d ever been to. Some highlights:

portfolio sharing of illustrators on the opening night, then opening keynote by Jack Laws who shared his approach to nature observation and inquiry while outdoors with his sketch book. Jane Kim told us about her gutsy Kickstarter to create art California Highway 395 (Migrating Murals) to call attention the plight of big horn sheep in the areas in which their migration was endangered, Breck Tyler who shared some wonderful discoveries about albatrosses in the Midway Atoll, techniques presentations where artists shared their Reid Psaltis, Jennifer Bates, and Linda Feltner shared technical details of their art, a communal mural of animals in the Monteray Bay area, and finally talks by Terryl Whitlatch (Star Wars, Brother Bear, many more) and even John Fleskes of Spectrum Fantastic Art who shared how he started spectrum many years go. Terryl’s talk was interesting because described how she used her understanding of animal anatomy to make imaginary creatures believable. I also was able to do a workshop with her where she showed how she designed a hippogriff. During her plenary talk, she shared a lot of backstories, including how she design Sebulba to be a an anti-Jar Jar based on the skeleton of a camel. The moose pictures are designs she created to imagine how a moose might move when it talked.

It was a great conference to hear from people at all stages of their career and working in very different ways.

Society of Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit in July – I’m In

By Animals, art school, birds, Children, Children's book illustration, digital, Drawing, Fantasy, Gage Academy, Illustration, RMCAD, SCBWI No Comments

horatio-color3I just heard today that Hornblower During the Crisis has been accepted in the SCBWI Western Washington Illustrators Exhibit at the Washington State Convention Center! This will be my first juried group exhibition. It  runs from July 1- September 30th. I also just dropped off  some art for the Best of the Gage Exhibition. The exhibition and sale there is June 17th, and of course the Clymer Museum exhibition goes through June 25th.

In addition to school, I’ve been experimenting with different ways of adding color. This past week I did some colored pencil work with the black and white owl and frog drawing. I like really like Faber-Castell Polychromos. They are oil-based, so blend with baby oil and can work side-by-side with watercolor paints or pencils.

Krister-Eide-Frog-Owl-Colored-Pencils-2crowI’ve also been doing some sketching and thinking about doing some illustrations for Hans Christian Anderson’s Snow Queen. There are two good crow characters that are part of the story so I thought it would be nice to do. We get a lot of crow visitors in the backyard.

I also saw an inspiring video today. Sargy Mann is a painter who became blind when he was his 30’s. See his story below.

 

Bunny Deep Sea Explorer and Jules Verne

By Animals, Children, Children's book illustration, Fantasy, Graphite, Illustration No Comments

bunny-sea-Krister-EideHere’s my pencil illustration for the the thumbnail I previously uploaded. I went with the underwater city. I took some of my inspiration loosely from those great Jules Verne books, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, and all the vintage diver stories. I’ll also post my inked / copic tone marker version at the bottom. Ink and copic markers are new media for me. I also am working on Mylar / Dura-lar, which is helpful for making frequent revisions, especially with ink.

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